Two.js is a two-dimensional drawing api geared towards modern web browsers


Two.js is a two-dimensional drawing api geared towards modern web browsers. It is renderer agnostic enabling the same api to draw in multiple contexts: svgcanvas, and webgl.

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Development Version
Uncompressed with comments about 128kb

Production Version
Minified using Closure Compiler about 50kb

 Prior to v0.7.0-alpha.1 Two.js requires Underscore.js and Backbone.js Events. If you’re already loading these files elsewhere then you can build the project yourself and get the file size even smaller. For more information on custom builds check out the source on github.

Overview

  • Focus on Vector Shapes

    Two.js is deeply inspired by flat motion graphics. As a result, two.js aims to make the creation and animation of flat shapes easier and more concise.

  • Scenegraph

    At its core two.js relies on a scenegraph. This means that when you draw or create an object (a Two.Path or Two.Group), two actually stores and remembers that. After you make the object you can apply any number of operations to it — e.g: rotationtranslationscale, etc..

  • Animation Loop

    Two.js has a built in animation loop. It is simple in nature and can be automated or paired with another animation library. For more information check out the examples.

  • SVG Interpreter

    Two.js features a Scalable Vector Graphics Interpreter. This means developers and designers alike can create SVG elements in commercial applications like Adobe Illustrator and bring them into your two.js scene. For more information check out the examples.

Basic Usage

In order to start any of these demos you’ll want to download two.js and add it to your <html> document. Once downloaded add this tag to the <head> of your document: http://./path-to-two/two.js. When you visit the page, you should be able to open up the console and type Two. If this returns a function then you’re ready to begin!

 

Drawing Your First Shapes

Before we get into all the fancy animating it’s good to get a feel for how to make shapes in two.js. In order to do this we need to have an instance of two. This sets up a dom element that contains either an svg or canvaselement to add to the webpage. The two object has a scene which holds all shapes as well as methods for creating shapes.

 For a list of all properties and construction parameters check out the documentation.


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// Make an instance of two and place it on the page.
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var elem = document.getElementById('draw-shapes');
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var params = { width: 285, height: 200 };
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var two = new Two(params).appendTo(elem);
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// two has convenience methods to create shapes.
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var circle = two.makeCircle(72, 100, 50);
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var rect = two.makeRectangle(213, 100, 100, 100);
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// The object returned has many stylable properties:
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circle.fill = '#FF8000';
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circle.stroke = 'orangered'; // Accepts all valid css color
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circle.linewidth = 5;
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rect.fill = 'rgb(0, 200, 255)';
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rect.opacity = 0.75;
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rect.noStroke();
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// Don't forget to tell two to render everything
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// to the screen
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two.update();

Shapes and Groups

Adding shapes to groups makes managing multiple shapes easier and more sane. Group’s provide an easy way to move your content through translationrotation, and scale. These operations emit from the coordinate space (0, 0). In the example below we can see that the initial orientation of the circle and rectangle changed from the first example. These shapes are oriented around (0, 0), which allows us to transform the group around the centeroid of the shapes. In addition Group’s styling operations trickle down and apply to each shape.

 All rendered objects in two.js are a child of a group. Every two instance has a property scene. This property is a root-level Two.Group and can act as a camera through the same transformations described above.


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var elem = document.getElementById('draw-group');
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var two = new Two({ width: 285, height: 200 }).appendTo(elem);
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var circle = two.makeCircle(-70, 0, 50);
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var rect = two.makeRectangle(70, 0, 100, 100);
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circle.fill = '#FF8000';
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circle.stroke = 'orangered';
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rect.fill = 'rgba(0, 200, 255, 0.75)';
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rect.stroke = '#1C75BC';
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// Groups can take an array of shapes and/or groups.
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var group = two.makeGroup(circle, rect);
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// And have translation, rotation, scale like all shapes.
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group.translation.set(two.width / 2, two.height / 2);
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group.rotation = Math.PI;
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group.scale = 0.75;
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// You can also set the same properties a shape have.
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group.linewidth = 7;
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two.update();

 

Adding Motion

Finally, let’s add some motion to our shapes. So far the examples use two.update(); to draw content to the screen. The instance of two.js has two particular methods for animation. The first is two.play(); which calls two.update(); at 60fps. This rate, however, will slowdown if there’s too much content to render per frame.

The second method is two.bind(); This method takes a string as its first parameter indicating what event to listen to and a function as its second argument delineating what to do when the event described in the first parameter happens. To sync a function with the animation loop simply invoke two.bind('update', referenceToFunction); as outlined below:

 For a complete list of events that can be bound to an instance of two check out the documentation.


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var elem = document.getElementById('draw-animation');
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var two = new Two({ width: 285, height: 200 }).appendTo(elem);
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var circle = two.makeCircle(-70, 0, 50);
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var rect = two.makeRectangle(70, 0, 100, 100);
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circle.fill = '#FF8000';
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rect.fill = 'rgba(0, 200, 255, 0.75)';
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var group = two.makeGroup(circle, rect);
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group.translation.set(two.width / 2, two.height / 2);
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group.scale = 0;
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group.noStroke();
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// Bind a function to scale and rotate the group
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// to the animation loop.
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two.bind('update', function(frameCount) {
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  // This code is called everytime two.update() is called.
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  // Effectively 60 times per second.
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  if (group.scale > 0.9999) {
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    group.scale = group.rotation = 0;
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  }
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  var t = (1 - group.scale) * 0.125;
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  group.scale += t;
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  group.rotation += t * 4 * Math.PI;
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}).play();  // Finally, start the animation loop

Examples

For even more examples check out the example page here.

Projects

For even more projects and information to submit your projects built with two.js check out the project page here.

Documentation

    • Two

    • When you import the library Two is a window level class that serves as the main interaction point for the project. It exposes a number of methods and properties. These make it possible to draw, but also afford other capabilities such as augmenting the drawing space. Below are the documented properties and features of the Two class. Unless specified methods return their instance of Two for the purpose of chaining.
    • construction var two = new Two(params);

      Create a new instance of Two where params is a JavaScript object with several optional parameters listed below:

      • type params.type

        Set the type of renderer for the instance: svg, webgl, canvas, etc.. Applicable types are carried within Two.Types. Default type is Two.Types.svg.

      • width params.width

        Set the width of the drawing space. Disregarded if params.fullscreen is set to true. Default width is 640 pixels.

      • height params.height

        Set the height of the drawing space. Disregarded if params.fullscreen is set to true. Default height is 480 pixels.

      • autostart params.autostart

        A boolean to automatically add the instance to draw on requestAnimationFrame. This is a convenient substitute so you don’t have to call two.play().

      • fullscreen params.fullscreen

        A boolean to set the drawing space of the instance to be fullscreen or not. If set to truethen width and height parameters will not be respected.

      • ratio params.ratio

        Set the resolution ratio for canvas and webgl renderers. If left blank two.js automatically infers the ratio based on the devicePixelRatio api.

    • type two.type

      A string representing which type of renderer the instance has implored.

    • frameCount two.frameCount

      A number representing how many frames have elapsed.

    • timeDelta two.timeDelta

      A number representing how much time has elapsed since the last frame in milliseconds.

    • width two.width

      The width of the instance’s dom element.

    • height two.height

      The height of the instance’s dom element.

    • playing two.playing

      A boolean representing whether or not the instance is being updated through the automatic requestAnimationFrame.

    • renderer two.renderer

      The instantiated rendering class for the instance. For a list of possible rendering types check out Two.Types.

    • scene two.scene

      The base level Two.Group which houses all objects for the instance. Because it is a Two.Group transformations can be applied to it that will affect all objects in the instance. This is handy as a makeshift camera.

    • appendTo two.appendTo(domElement);

      A convenient method to append the instance’s dom element to the page. It’s required to add the instance’s dom element to the page in order to see anything drawn.

    • play two.play();

      This method adds the instance to the requestAnimationFrame loop. In affect enabling animation for this instance.

    • pause two.pause();

      This method removes the instance from the requestAnimationFrame loop. In affect halting animation for this instance.

    • update two.update();

      This method updates the dimensions of the drawing space, increments the tick for animation, and finally calls two.render(). When using the built-in requestAnimationFrame hook, two.play(), this method is invoked for you automatically.

    • render two.render();

      This method makes the instance’s renderer draw. It should be unnecessary to invoke this yourself at anytime.

    • add two.add(objects);

      Add one or many shapes / groups to the instance. Objects can be added as arguments, two.add(o1, o2, oN), or as an array depicted above.

    • remove two.remove(objects);

      Remove one or many shapes / groups from the instance. Objects can be removed as arguments, two.remove(o1, o2, oN), or as an array depicted above.

    • clear two.clear();

      Removes all objects from the instance’s scene. If you intend to have the browser garbage collect this, don’t forget to delete the references in your application as well.

    • makeLine two.makeLine(x1, y1, x2, y2);

      Draws a line between two coordinates to the instance’s drawing space where x1y1 are the x, y values for the first coordinate and x2y2 are the x, y values for the second coordinate. It returns a Two.Line object.

    • makeRectangle two.makeRectangle(x, y, width, height);

      Draws a rectangle to the instance’s drawing space where xy are the x, y values for the center point of the rectangle and widthheight represents the width and height of the rectangle. It returns a Two.Rectangle object.

    • makeRoundedRectangle two.makeRoundedRectangle(x, y, width, height, radius);

      Draws a rounded rectangle to the instance’s drawing space where xy are the x, y values for the center point of the rectangle and widthheightrepresents the width and height of the rectangle. Lastly, the radius parameter defines what the miter radius of the rounded corner is. It returns a Two.RoundedRectangle object.

    • makeCircle two.makeCircle(x, y, radius);

      Draws a circle to the instance’s drawing space where xy are the x, y values for the center point of the circle and radius is the radius of the circle. It returns a Two.Circle object.

    • makeEllipse two.makeEllipse(x, y, width, height);

      Draws an ellipse to the instance’s drawing space where xy are the x, y values for the center point of the ellipse and widthheight are the dimensions of the ellipse. It returns a Two.Ellipse object.

    • makeStar two.makeStar(ox, oy, or, ir, sides);

      Draws a star to the instance’s drawing space where oxoy are the x, y values for the center point of the star and orir are the outer and inner radii for the star, and sides are how many points the star has. It returns a Two.Starobject.

    • makePolygon two.makePolygon(ox, oy, r, sides);

      Draws a polygon to the instance’s drawing space where oxoy are the x, y values for the center of the polygon, r is the radius, and sides are how many sides the polygon has. It returns a Two.Polygon object.

    • makeArcSegment two.makeArcSegment(ox, oy, ir, or, sa, ea, res);

      Draws an arc segment from center point oxoy with an inner and outer radius of iror. Lastly, you need to supply a start and ending angle saea. Optionally, pass the resolution for how many points on the arc are desired. It returns a Two.ArcSegment object.

    • makeCurve two.makeCurve(x1, y1, x2, y2, xN, yN, open);

      Draws a curved path to the instance’s drawing space. The arguments are a little tricky. It returns a Two.Path object.

      The method accepts any amount of paired x, y values as denoted by the series above. It then checks to see if there is a final argument, a boolean open, which marks whether or not the shape should be open. If true the curve will have two clear endpoints, otherwise it will be closed.

      This method also recognizes the format two.makeCurve(points, open)where points is an array of Two.Anchor‘s and open is an optional boolean describing whether or not to expose endpoints. It is imperative if you generate curves this way to make the list of points Two.Anchor‘s.

    • makePath two.makePath(x1, y1, x2, y2, xN, yN, open);

      Draws a path to the instance’s drawing space. The arguments are a little tricky. It returns a Two.Path object.

      The method accepts any amount of paired x, y values as denoted by the series above. It then checks to see if there is a final argument, a boolean open, which marks whether or not the shape should be open. If true the path will have two clear endpoints, otherwise it will be closed.

      This method also recognizes the format two.makePath(points, open) where points is an array of Two.Anchor‘s and open is an optional boolean describing whether or not to expose endpoints. It is imperative if you generate curves this way to make the list of points Two.Anchor‘s.

       The Two.Path that this method creates is the base shape for all of the make functions.

    • makeGroup two.makeGroup(objects);

      Adds a group to the instance’s drawing space. While a group does not have any visible features when rendered it allows for nested transformations on shapes. See Two.Group for more information. It accepts an array of objects, Two.Paths or Two.Groups. As well as a list of objects as the arguments, two.makeGroup(o1, o2, oN). It returns a Two.Group object.

    • interpret two.interpret(svgNode);

      Reads an svg node and draws the svg object by creating Two.Paths and Two.Groups from the reference. It then adds it to the instance’s drawing space. It returns a Two.Group object.

    • bind two.bind(event, callback);

      Bind an event, string, to a callback function. Passing "all" will bind the callback to all events. Inherited from Backbone.js.

    • unbind two.unbind(event, callback);

      Remove one or many callback functions. If callback is null it removes all callbacks for an event. If the event name is null, all callback functions for the instance are removed. This is highly discouraged. Inherited from Backbone.js.

    • Array Two.Array

      A JavaScript Float32Array with graceful fallback to JavaScript Array.

    • Collection Two.Utils.Collection

      A databound instance of an array, e.g: used for vertices attribute of a Two.Path.

    • Types Two.Types

      A list of applicable types of rendering contexts. This is used to standardize the addresses of the various renderers. The types include svgcanvas, and webgl. e.g: Two.Types.svg

    • Properties Two.Properties

      A list of renderer specific application properties.

    • Events Two.Events

      A list of actionable events triggered by a given instance. For the most part these are internal events in order to enable two-way databinding. Exceptions include update event on animation loop and resize when the dimensions of the drawing space change. Related to two.bind and two.trigger.

    • Commands Two.Commands

      A list of commands that dictate how the various renderers draw Two.Anchors.

    • Resolution Two.Resolution

      A number representing how many subdivisions should be present during curve calculations.

    • Instances Two.Instances

      A running list of all instances created on the page.

    • noConflict Two.noConflict();

      Run two.js in noConflict mode, returning the two variable to its previous owner. Returns a reference to the Two class.

    • Utils Two.Utils

      A collection of utility functions and variables used throughout the project. This is where much of the algorithmic computation lies: computing curve handles, subdividing cubic bezier curves, interpretting svg nodes. Because of its complexity it’s encouraged to look at the source code for further information.

    • Error Two.Error(message);

      A two.js specific custom error handler. Takes a message, string, to display in the console to developers.

    • Two.Path

    • This is the base class for creating all drawable shapes in two.js. Unless specified methods return their instance of Two.Path for the purpose of chaining.
    • construction var path = new Two.Path(vertices, closed, curved, manual);

      A path takes an array of vertices which are made up of Two.Anchors. This is essential for the two-way databinding. It then takes two booleans, closed and curved which delineate whether the shape should be closed (lacking endpoints) and whether the shape should calculate curves or straight lines between the vertices. Finally, manual is an optional argument if you’d like to override the default behavior of two.js and handle anchor positions yourself. Generally speaking, this isn’t something you need to deal with, although some great usecases arise from this customability, e.g: advanced curve manipulation.

       If you are constructing groups this way instead of two.makePath(), then don’t forget to add the group to the instance’s scene, two.add(group).

    • id path.id

      The id of the path. In the svg renderer this is the same number as the idattribute given to the corresponding node. i.e: if path.id = 4 then document.querySelector('#two-' + group.id) will return the corresponding svg node.

    • stroke path.stroke

      A string representing the color for the stroke of the path. All valid css representations of color are accepted.

    • fill path.fill

      A string representing the color for the area of the vertices. All valid css representations of color are accepted.

    • linewidth path.linewidth

      A number representing the thickness the path’s strokes. Must be a positive number.

    • opacity path.opacity

      A number representing the opacity of the path. Use strictly for setting. Must be a number 0-1.

    • cap path.cap

      A string representing the type of stroke cap to render. All applicable values can be found on the w3c spec. Defaults to "round".

    • join path.join

      A string representing the type of stroke join to render. All applicable values can be found on the w3c spec. Defaults to "round".

    • miter path.miter

      A number representing the miter limit for the stroke. Defaults to 1.

    • rotation path.rotation

      A number that represents the rotation of the path in the drawing space, in radians.

    • scale path.scale

      A number that represents the uniform scale of the path in the drawing space.

    • translation path.translation

      Two.Vector that represents x, y translation of the path in the drawing space.

    • parent path.parent

      A reference to the Two.Group that contains this instance.

    • vertices path.vertices

      Two.Utils.Collection of Two.Anchors that is two-way databound. Individual vertices may be manipulated.

    • closed path.closed

      Boolean that describes whether the path is closed or not.

    • curved path.curved

      Boolean that describes whether the path is curved or not.

    • automatic path.automatic

      Boolean that describes whether the path should automatically dictate how Two.Anchors behave. This defaults to true.

    • beginning path.beginning

      A number, 0-1, that is mapped to the layout and order of vertices. It represents which of the vertices from beginning to end should start the shape. Exceedingly helpful for animating strokes. Defaults to 0.

    • ending path.ending

      A number, 0-1, that is mapped to the layout and order of vertices. It represents which of the vertices from beginning to end should end the shape. Exceedingly helpful for animating strokes. Defaults to 1.

    • clip path.clip

      A boolean describing whether to render this shape as a clipping maskThis property is set automatically in correspondence with Two.Group.mask. Defaults to false.

    • clone path.clone();

      Returns a new instance of a Two.Path with the same settings.

    • center path.center();

      Anchors all vertices around the centroid of the group.

    • addTo path.addTo(group);

      Adds the instance to a Two.Group.

    • remove path.remove();

      If added to a two.scene this method removes itself from it.

    • getBoundingClientRect path.getBoundingClientRect(shallow);

      Returns an object with top, left, right, bottom, width, and height parameters representing the bounding box of the path. Pass true if you’re interested in the shallow positioning, i.e in the space directly affecting the object and not where it is nested.

    • noFill path.noFill();

      Removes the fill.

    • noStroke path.noStroke();

      Removes the stroke.

    • plot path.plot();

      If curved goes through the vertices and calculates the curve. If not, then goes through the vertices and calculates the lines.

    • subdivide path.subdivide();

      Creates a new set of vertices that are lineTo anchors. For previously straight lines the anchors remain the same. For curved lines, however, Two.Utils.subdivide is used to generate a new set of straight lines that are perceived as a curve.

    • MakeObservable Two.Path.MakeObservable(obj);

      Convenience method to make getter / setter properties specific to Two.Path.

    • Two.Line

    • This is a class for creating a line in two.js. It inherits from Two.Path, so it has all the same properties and functions as Two.Path.
    • construction var line = new Two.Line(x1, y1, x2, y2);

      A line takes two sets of xy coordinates. x1y1 to define the left endpoint and x2y2 to define the right endpoint.

    • Two.Rectangle

    • This is a class for creating a rectangle in two.js. It inherits from Two.Path, so it has all the same properties and functions as Two.Path.
    • construction var rectangle = new Two.Rectangle(x, y, width, height);

      A rectangle takes a set of xy coordinates as its origin (the center of the rectangle by default) and widthheight parameters to define the width and height of the rectangle.

    • Two.RoundedRectangle

    • This is a class for creating a rounded rectangle in two.js. It inherits from Two.Path, so it has all the same properties and functions as Two.Path.
    • construction var roundedRect = new Two.RoundedRectangle(x, y, width, height, radius);

      A rounded rectangle takes a set of xy coordinates as its origin (the center of the rounded rectangle by default) and widthheight parameters to define the width and height of the rectangle. Lastly, it takes an optional radiusnumber representing the radius of the curve along the corner of the rectangle. radius defaults to 1/12th the of the smaller value between widthheight.

    • Two.Ellipse

    • This is a class for creating an ellipse in two.js. It inherits from Two.Path, so it has all the same properties and functions as Two.Path.
    • construction var ellipse = new Two.Ellipse(x, y, width, height);

      An ellipse takes a set of xy coordinates as its origin (the center of the ellipse by default) and widthheight parameters to define the width and height of the ellipse.

       To construct a circle leave height empty and the height will default to the width.

    • Two.Star

    • This is a class for creating a star in two.js. It inherits from Two.Path, so it has all the same properties and functions as Two.Path.
    • construction var star = new Two.Star(x, y, or, ir, sides);

      A star takes a set of xy coordinates as its origin (the center of the star by default) and or parameter to define the outer radius of the star. Optionally you can define an ir inner radius for the star and sides for how many sides the star has. By default he ir is half the or and there are 5 sides.

    • Two.Polygon

    • This is a class for creating a polygon, symmetrically multi-sided shape, in two.js. It inherits from Two.Path, so it has all the same properties and functions as Two.Path.
    • construction var polygon = new Two.Polygon(x, y, radius, sides);

      A polygon takes a set of xy coordinates as its origin (the center of the polygon by default) and radiussides parameters to define the radius of the polygon and how many sides the polygon has. By default there are 3 sides, a triangle.

       Prior to two.js v0.5.0 Two.Polygon acted as the base drawing class. What Two.Path effectively is after v0.5.0.

    • Two.Group

    • This is a container object for two.js — it can hold shapes as well as other groups. At a technical level it can be considered an empty transformation matrix. It is recommended to use two.makeGroup() in order to add groups to your instance of two, but it’s not necessary. Unless specified methods return their instance of Two.Group for the purpose of chaining.
    • construction var group = new Two.Group();

       If you are constructing groups this way instead of two.makeGroup(), then don’t forget to add the group to the instance’s scene, two.add(group).

    • id group.id

      The id of the group. In the svg renderer this is the same number as the idattribute given to the corresponding node. i.e: if group.id = 5 then document.querySelector('#two-' + group.id) will return the corresponding node.

    • stroke group.stroke

      A string representing the color for the stroke of all child shapes. Use strictly for setting. All valid css representations of color are accepted.

    • fill group.fill

      A string representing the color for the area of all child shapes. Use strictly for setting. All valid css representations of color are accepted.

    • linewidth group.linewidth

      A number representing the thickness of all child shapes’ strokes. Use strictly for setting. Must be a positive number.

    • opacity group.opacity

      A number representing the opacity of all child shapes. Use strictly for setting. Must be a number 0-1.

    • cap group.cap

      A string representing the type of stroke cap to render for all child shapes. Use strictly for setting. All applicable values can be found on the w3c spec. Defaults to "round".

    • join group.join

      A string representing the type of stroke join to render for all child shapes. Use strictly for setting. All applicable values can be found on the w3c spec. Defaults to "round".

    • miter group.miter

      A number representing the miter limit for the stroke of all child objects. Use strictly for setting. Defaults to 1.

    • rotation group.rotation

      A number that represents the rotation of the group in the drawing space, in radians.

    • scale group.scale

      A number that represents the uniform scale of the group in the drawing space.

    • translation group.translation

      Two.Vector that represents x, y translation of the group in the drawing space.

    • children group.children

      A map of all the children of the group.

    • parent group.parent

      A reference to the Two.Group that contains this instance.

    • mask group.mask

      A reference to the Two.Path that masks the content within the group. Automatically sets the referenced Two.Path.clip to true.

    • clone group.clone();

      Returns a new instance of a Two.Group with the same settings.

       This will copy the children as well, which can be computationally expensive.

    • center group.center();

      Anchors all children around the centroid of the group.

    • addTo group.addTo(group);

      Adds the instance to a Two.Group. In many ways the inverse of two.add(object).

    • add group.add(objects);

      Add one or many shapes / groups to the instance. Objects can be added as arguments, two.add(o1, o2, oN), or as an array depicted above.

    • remove group.remove(objects);

      Remove one or many shapes / groups to the instance. Objects can be removed as arguments, two.remove(o1, o2, oN), or as an array depicted above.

    • getBoundingClientRect group.getBoundingClientRect(shallow);

      Returns an object with top, left, right, bottom, width, and height parameters representing the bounding box of the path. Pass true if you’re interested in the shallow positioning, i.e in the space directly affecting the object and not where it is nested.

    • noFill group.noFill();

      Remove the fill from all children of the group.

    • noStroke group.noStroke();

      Remove the stroke from all children of the group.

    • MakeObservable Two.Group.MakeObservable(obj);

      Convenience method to make getter / setter properties specific to Two.Group.

    • Two.Vector

    • This is the atomic coordinate representation for two.js. A Two.Vector is different and specific to two.js because its main properties, x and y, trigger events which allow the renderers to efficiently change only when they need to. Unless specified methods return their instance of Two.Vector for the purpose of chaining.
    • construction var vector = new Two.Vector(x, y);

    • x vector.x

      The x value of the vector.

    • y vector.y

      The y value of the vector.

    • set vector.set(x, y);

      Set the xy properties of the vector to the arguments xy.

    • copy vector.copy(v);

      Set the xy properties of the vector from another vector, v.

    • clear vector.clear();

      Set the xy properties of the vector to 0.

    • clone vector.clone();

      Returns a new instance of a Two.Vector with the same xy values as the instance.

    • add vector.add(v1, v2);

      Add to vectors together. The sum of the xy values will be set to the instance.

    • addSelf vector.addSelf(v);

      Add the xy values of the instance to the values of another vector. Set the sum to the instance’s values.

    • sub vector.sub(v1, v2);

      Subtract two vectors. Set the difference to the instance.

    • subSelf vector.subSelf(v);

      Subtract a vector, v, from the instance.

    • multiplySelf vector.multiplySelf(v);

      Multiply the xy values of the instance by another vector’s, vxy values.

    • multiplyScalar vector.multiplyScalar(value);

      Multiply the xy values of the instance by another number, value.

    • divideScalar vector.divideScalar(value);

      Divide the xy values of the instance by another number, value.

    • negate vector.negate();

      Toggle the sign of the instance’s xy values.

    • dot vector.dot(v);

      Return the dot product of the instance and a vector, v.

    • lengthSquared vector.lengthSquared();

      Return the length of the vector squared.

    • length vector.length();

      Return the length of the vector.

    • normalize vector.normalize();

      Reduce the length of the vector to the unit circle.

    • distanceTo vector.distanceTo(v);

      Return the distance from the instance to another vector, v.

    • distanceToSquared vector.distanceToSquared(v);

      Return the distance squared from the instance to another vector, v.

    • setLength vector.setLength(length);

      Set the length of a vector to a specified distance, length.

    • equals vector.equals(v);

      Return a boolean representing whether or not the vectors are within 0.0001 of each other. This fuzzy equality helps with Physics libraries.

    • lerp vector.lerp(v, t);

      Linear interpolation of the instance’s current xy values to the destination vector, v, by an amount, t. Where t is a value 0-1.

    • isZero vector.isZero();

      Returns a boolean describing the length of the vector less than 0.0001.

    • Two.Anchor

    • Taken from the Adobe Illustrator nomenclature a Two.Anchor represents an anchor point in two.js. This class delineates to the renderer what action to take when plotting points. It inherits all properties and methods from Two.Vector. As a result, Two.Anchor can be used as such. Depending on its command, anchor points may or may not have corresponding control points to describe how their bezier curves should be rendered.
    • construction var anchor = new Two.Anchor(x, y, lx, ly, rx, ry, command);

      Two.Anchor can take initial positions of x and y to orient the point. lx and ly describe where the left control point will reside. Likewise rx and rydescribe where the right control point will reside. Finally, the commanddescribes what action the renderer will take once rendering. A more detailed description of commands can be found on the w3c and the available commands in two.js can be found under Two.Commands.

       Two.Anchor is introduced to two.js as of v0.3.0

    • x anchor.x

      The x value of the anchor’s position.

    • y anchor.y

      The y value of the anchor’s position.

    • command anchor.command

      The command for the given anchor.

    • controls anchor.controls

      An object that exists only when anchor.command is Two.Commands.curve. It holds the anchor’s control point Two.Vectors and describes what the make up of the curve will be.

      • right anchor.controls.right

        Two.Vector that represents the position of the control point to the “right” of the anchor’s position. To further clarify, if you were to orient the anchor so that it was normalized and facing up, this control point would be to the right of it.

      • left anchor.controls.left

        Two.Vector that represents the position of the control point to the “left” of the anchor’s position. To further clarify, if you were to orient the anchor so that it was normalized and facing up, this control point would be to the left of it.

    • clone anchor.clone();

      Returns a new instance of a Two.Anchor with the same xycontrols, and command values as the instance.

    • listen anchor.listen();

      Convenience method to add event bubbling to an attached path.

    • ignore anchor.ignore();

      Convenience method to remove event bubbling to an attached path.

    • AppendCurveProperties Anchor.AppendCurveProperties();

      Convenience method to add the controls object.

    • Two.Stop

    • This is a class for defining how gradients are colored in two.js. By itself a Two.Stop doesn’t render anything specifically to the screen.
    • construction var stop = new Two.Stop(offset, color, opacity);

      A stop takes a 0 to 1 offset value which defines where on the trajectory of the gradient the full color is rendered. It also takes a color which is a cssstring representing the color value and an optional opacity which is also a 0to 1 value.

    • offset stop.offset

      0 to 1 offset value which defines where on the trajectory of the gradient the full color is rendered.

    • color stop.color

      css string that represents the color of the stop.

    • opacity stop.opacity

      0 to 1 value which defines the opacity of the stop.

       This only renders in the Two.Types.svg mode.

    • clone stop.clone();

      Clones a stop. Returns a new Two.Stop.

    • Two.LinearGradient

    • This is a class for creating a LinearGradient in two.js. By itself a Two.LinearGradient doesn’t render anything specifically to the screen. However, in conjunction with a Two.Path you can style Two.Path.fill or Two.Path.stroke with a Two.LinearGradient to render a gradient for that part of the Two.Path. Check the examples page for exact usage.
    • construction var linearGradient = new Two.LinearGradient(x1, y1, x2, y2, stops);

      A linear gradient takes two sets of xy coordinates to define the endpoints of the styling. These coordinates are relative to the origin of a Two.Path. This typically means you’ll want to go from a negative quadrant to a positive quadrant in order for the gradient to render correctly. Lastly it takes an array of Two.Stops which represent the color value along the gradient’s trajectory.

    • left linearGradient.left

      Two.Vector that represents the position of the xy coordinates to the “left” of the gradient’s two end points.

    • right linearGradient.right

      Two.Vector that represents the position of the xy coordinates to the “right” of the gradient’s two end points.

    • spread linearGradient.spread

      Defines how the gradient is rendered by the renderer. For more details see the w3c svg spec.

    • stops linearGradient.stops

      Two.Utils.Collection of Two.Stops that is two-way databound. Individual stops may be manipulated.

    • clone linearGradient.clone();

      A function to clone a linearGradient. Also, clones each Two.Stop in the linearGradient.stops array.

    • Two.RadialGradient

    • This is a class for creating a RadialGradient in two.js. By itself a Two.RadialGradient doesn’t render anything specifically to the screen. However, in conjunction with a Two.Path you can style Two.Path.fill or Two.Path.stroke with a Two.RadialGradient to render a gradient for that part of the Two.Path. Check the examples page for exact usage.
    • construction var radialGradient = new Two.radialGradient(x, y, radius, stops, fx, fy);

      A radial gradient takes a set of xy coordinates to define the center of the styling. These coordinates are relative to the origin of a Two.Path. This typically means you’ll want to set these to 00. Next define how large the radius for the radial gradient is. Lastly, pass an array of Two.Stops to define the coloring of the radial gradient. Optionally, you can pass a set of xycoordinates to define the focal position of the radial gradient’s trajectory.

    • center radialGradient.center

      Two.Vector that represents the position of the xy coordinates at the center of the gradient.

    • radius radialGradient.radius

      A number representing the radius of the radialGradient.

    • focal linearGradient.focal

      Two.Vector that represents the position of the xy coordinates as the focal point for the gradient’s trajectory.

    • spread radialGradient.spread

      Defines how the gradient is rendered by the renderer. For more details see the w3c svg spec.

    • stops radialGradient.stops

      Two.Utils.Collection of Two.Stops that is two-way databound. Individual stops may be manipulated.

    • clone radialGradient.clone();

      A function to clone a radialGradient. Also, clones each Two.Stop in the radialGradient.stops array.

  • Two.Text

  • This is a class for creating, manipulating, and rendering text dynamically in Two.js. As such it is rather primitive. You can use custom fonts through @Font Face spec. However, you do not have control over the glyphs themselves. If you’d like to mainpulate that specifically it is recommended to use SVG Interpreter. A text object extends Two.Shape.
  • construction var text = new Two.Text(message, x, y, styles);

    A text object takes in a message, the string representation of what will be displayed. It then takes an x and y number where the text object will be placed in the group. Finally, an optional styles object to apply any other additional styles. Applicable properties to affect can be found in Two.Text.Properties.

  • value text.value

    A string representing the text that will be rendered to the stage.

  • family text.family

    A string representing the css font-family to be applied to the rendered text. Default value is 'sans-serif'.

  • size text.size

    A number representing the text’s size to be applied to the rendered text. Default value is 13.

  • leading text.leading

    A number representing the leading, a.k.a. line-height, to be applied to the rendered text. Default value is 17.

  • alignment text.alignment

    A string representing the horizontal alignment to be applied to the rendered text. e.g: 'left''right', or 'center'. Default value is 'middle'.

  • fill text.fill

    A string representing the color for the text area to be filled. All valid css representations of color are accepted. Default value is '#000'.

  • stroke text.stroke

    A string representing the color for the text area to be stroked. All valid css representations of color are accepted. Default value is 'transparent'.

  • linewidth text.linewidth

    A number representing the linewidth to be applied to the rendered text. Default value is 1.

  • style text.style

    A string representing the font style to be applied to the rendered text. e.g: 'normal' or 'italic'. Default value is 'normal'.

  • weight text.weight

    A number or string representing the weight to be applied to the rendered text. e.g: 500 or 'normal'. For more information see the Font Weight Specification. Default value is 500.

  • decoration text.decoration

    A string representing the text decoration to be applied to the rendered text. e.g: 'none''underlined', or 'strikethrough'. Default value is 'none'

  • baseline text.baseline

    A string representing the vertical aligment to be applied to the rendered text. e.g: 'middle''baseline', or 'top'. Default value is 'middle'.

  • opacity text.opacity

    A number representing the opacity of the path. Use strictly for setting. Must be a number 0-1.

  • visible text.visible

    A boolean representing whether the text object is visible or not.

  • rotation text.rotation

    A number that represents the rotation of the text in the drawing space, in radians.

  • scale text.scale

    A number that represents the uniform scale of the text in the drawing space.

  • translation text.translation

    Two.Vector that represents x, y translation of the text in the drawing space.

  • clone text.clone();

    Returns a new instance of a Two.Text with the same settings.

  • getBoundingClientRect text.getBoundingClientRect(shallow);

    Currently returns an empty object. A shim for compatibility with matrix math in the various renderers.

  • noFill text.noFill();

    Removes the fill.

  • noStroke text.noStroke();

    Removes the stroke.

  • MakeObservable Two.Text.MakeObservable(obj);

    Convenience method to make getter / setter properties specific to Two.Text.

 

These are the main classes that a typical developer will come across with when using two.js, however the project is built with a few more classes behind the scene. If you’re interested in the nitty-gritty then it’s recommended to check out the source.

Credits

Two.js is not possible without these great contributions to JavaScript:

Anúncios

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